Archives for posts with tag: treatment

Protect your face from the sun by wearing sunblock. Apply moisturizer on your hands after washing to restore lost hydration. Exfoliate your body during your shower or bath to remove dead skin cells.

All this is wonderful advice but when is the last time someone told you to take care of your elbows?

elbow2

Elbows, that’s right. This skin is exposed to just as much (if not more) damage as the rest of your body but is      usually overlooked when you begin to develop a skin care routine.

Take a look at your elbows now: is the skin dry, rough, or even darker in color than the rest of your arm? Do      you routinely lean your elbow against a desk or wall? How often do you take the time to really moisturize your elbows at night or in the morning?

The skin on your elbows is thicker to protect your elbow bone. It is much thicker than the skin around your eyes, for example. This means that it is designed to withstand more exposure to abusive activities but it does not mean it is immune to being damaged as a result.

Thicker skin is more prone to dryness, especially in the winter. Add to that exposure to rough surfaces such as wood or plastic (from leaning on a desk perhaps?) or even your clothes can all cause your skin to become dry and rough.

The solution?

Usually a regular moisturizer won’t be a remedy since this skin is so thick. It requires extra care. So the first step is to remember to EXFOLIATE your elbows in the shower. Exfoliation removes the built up dead skin cells. A proper skin care routine should routinely exfoliate your skin (the whole body, not just the face) every other day.

Deep treatment is usually needed to reverse the existing damage to your elbows. Petroleum jelly is a wonderful (and inexpensive) way to help restore lost moisture. Apply a thick coat to your elbows at night (cover with a cloth to protect your sheets – an old sock with the toes cut off would work wonderfully) and repeat for 5-10 days.

After 5-10 days, apply a body lotion (avoid any containing alcohol as this can irritate and dry skin out) every day. Remember to keep exfoliating your skin to prevent a reoccurrence.

Still not working?

You may need to check with a dermatologist to rule out any other skin concerns or conditions which may be resulting in dry skin. A dermatologist can prescribe stronger treatments to help reduce dryness and reverse the problem if there is an underlying medical condition.

Final thoughts

Treat your skin with love and care – remember that proper daily skin care can prevent signs of aging and more serious skin conditions from developing. As we age, your skin will require more care to maintain a healthy, youthful glow but when incorporated as part of your daily routine (like working out) the benefits will far outweigh the time you need to spend maintaining your skin every day. Learn more online at www.bellaninainstitute.com.

Advertisements

The teen years are filled with emotional and physical change, some good and some bad. As your teen grows and develops it is natural, as a parent, to want this experience to be as stress free as possible. Dealing with acne can be a difficult process for both you and your teen. By working together and developing a strategy however, you can help your teen through these awkward years with much less “angst”.

You may find that the most difficult aspect of treating acne is speaking with your teen about the problem. It is natural for people to become sensitive or angry when a skin condition is “called out” and this may create more stress for your teen. Remember that your teen is not unaware of the problem and acting as though they cannot see the acne will not help you communicate better with them. Open up a dialogue where you suggest trying different methods to treat the condition but respect your teen’s boundaries if they are defensive about the topic at first. Don’t exasperate the situation by yelling or forcing your child to confront their problem.

Once you have both agreed to find a sensible solution that will be effective and affordable, now it is time to learn the underlying root of the condition. Believe it or not there are several factors that may be affecting your teen’s skin, not just new hormonal changes (although that is a HUGE factor).

So what may be culprit of this skin care conundrum?

Changes in the body (such as hormones) are one of the primary influences of acne during the teen years. Any informational guide will explain that hormonal changes impact the bodies normal functioning, including the skin. During adolescence a teen’s oil production (the sebum gland) can go into overdrive and produce more oil than necessary. The skin’s normal regulation of this process cannot compensate and thus oil clogs the pores causing acne.
Proper skin care is important, even for teens. Make-up, sweat and general grime build up on the skin’s surface and need to be removed properly. If you’re teen is just using soap and water daily (or maybe not at all sometimes) this will be a major reason why acne is starting to take over their face. Developing a daily skin care routine designed for younger people with oilier skin will go a long way towards alleviating your teen’s condition and reducing future occurrences.
Stress. Stress. Stress. As a parent there is nothing you can really do to combat the stress and emotional changes your child is undergoing but be supportive and helps them through this difficult time. Remember that stress affects the body just as much as anything else and can inhibit healthy body processes (including the skin).

A Call to Action!

Gaining control on an existing or ongoing flair up is crucial for the first step. This does need to be combined with developing a longer skin care regimen that will aid in reducing existing outbreaks and prevents new ones from developing.
Try a “spot treatment” such as this excellent Blemish Fix for existing acne. This will target the existing problem and provide extra strength to those areas that have already developed blackheads, whiteheads or red pustules. There are several over the counter brands for mild to moderate acne or it may be time to consult with an esthetician or dermatologist for more intensive treatment for severe acne.
Take control by developing a simple skin care routine for your teen to follow every day. Set a schedule (wake up, going to bed) and guide them through the steps they should take. Cleanse, exfoliate, tone, correct, moisturize and protect. These are the six hallmarks of any great skin care routine that will keep their skin looking fresh, clean and clear.
Search for products geared towards teen, oily or acneic skin. These will use less oils (no need to add to the problem) and target reducing oily build up on the skin. Don’t forget to emphasize the importance of using a good daily moisturizer to replenish the skin with necessary hydration. If you take it all away without putting any back other skin conditions (dryness, flaking). This step will be crucial in helping your teen maintain clearer skin with greatly reduced acne occurrences.

A Final Thought on the Matter

Acne is no fun for anyone and can be an embarrassing condition to face. Your teen may struggle with peer judgment, self doubt and a general dissatisfaction overall while combating this problem. Be patient with your teen and remember that full results take time (up to 3 months in many severe cases). Reassure your teen that with patience and dedication their skin will clear up. Don’t let acne be what your teen remembers about their high school years –take control today!

What’s Up with Freckles Anyway?

Have you ever stared into the mirror and wondered why your face and arms are covered with freckles? Depending on your skin type and sun exposure, the number of freckles may increase every year. If you are frustrated with the freckles and looking for ways to reduce their appearance, there may be options available for you to try!

First, the biology!

A freckle is a cluster of concentrated melanin and they are most visible on people with fair skin. Although a freckle can appear on anyone, they are genetic and are an inherited trait. The formation of freckles is triggered by exposure to sunlight. Freckles are also referred to as “ephelis”.

Social & Psychological
Some people consider freckles to be cute but others view them as an embarassment. The fact is that no one likes looking different from their friends and freckles can really make you stand out in a crowd. Freckles, although naturally occuring, can make children and teens feel different from their friends and perhaps even unattractive.

Where do freckles form?

Many people develop freckles in the areas most commonly exposed to the sun. The face including the nose and cheeks are usually the first to form patches of freckles. Other areas of the body such as the hands, back and arms may begin to develop freckles as exposure to sun and age increase. Freckles rarely form in fold areas of the body such as the armpits.

Are they dangerous?

It is easy to become concerned that spots on the skin may be a signal of another underlying condition. Freckles are not a skin disorder that requires treatment. They are a result of a lower concentration of photoprotective melanin in the skin and increased susceptibility to the damaging effects of UV radiation.

NOTE: It is important to consult with a dermatologist to determine if any new brown spots that form on your skin are dangerous or not. Skin conditions (such as skin cancer) may reveal themselves as new or irregular spots on the skin and should not be ignored. Consult with a doctor if you have any concerns.

Types and Appearance

Ephelides (simple freckles) are typically flat, round and light tan or brown. They appear most commonly on fair skinned people although they can appear on other skin types. Although the color and appearance of freckles tend to be uniform from person to person, colors may vary from reddish to yellow or even black. Most freckles are no larger than the head of an average nail.

Sunburn freckles are the result of increased exposure to the sun and burning of the skin. These will be much larger than their every day counterparts in that they are larger and have irregular borders. They appear most commonly on the back and arms (areas of the body more prone to overexposure).

How to Minimize the Appearance

Some freckles may gradually decrease in appearance over time. This is especially true during the colder months when exposure to the sun is minimized. Many people have freckles that just stay the same in appearance all year round. Minimizing the appearance of these can be a time consuming and frustrating process.

A skin lightener can be effective choice for helping to counter act the effects of hyperpigmentation in the skin. Skin lighteners decrease the appearance of brown spots of the skin to more closely match the surrounding coloration. Although these will not make freckles (or moles) disappear, they may greatly decrease their appearance.

Note: Some products may contain ingredients that can cause harm with extended use. Consult with an esthetician or dermatologist for recommendations if you are unsure or need additional information.

Prevention

Learning to prevent freckles from ever occurring is the best defense. Start by taking small steps:
Wear sunscreen (at least SPF30) daily – even in the winter!
Minimize exposure to the sun and tanning (especially burning)
Protect the skin by covering it up and wearing a brimmed hat

By taking these simple steps you may begin to see your freckles fade naturally over time. Remember that proper skin care takes dedication and determination but is achievable over time.


Like most common but harmless skin problems, rosacea is a chronic (ongoing) condition that is characterized most commonly by facial erythema (redness). Although it is harmless and mostly a cosmetic problem, rosacea can flair up frequently without warning and may require repeated treatment to keep under control. The good news is that several topical treatments are available today to help calm this inflammation and reduce the appearance over time.

The “What”

Rosacea is actually broken down into four “subtypes” that may occur on their own or in combination with each other:
1) Erythematotelangiectatic rosacea: This type is permanent redness in people with a tendency to appear flushed or blushing easily. Small blood vessels may be visible along the skin surface and in some cases; the skin may experience an itching or burning sensation.

2) Papulopustular rosacea: This type is most easily confused with acne as it is classified by red papules (bumps) on the skin that may be pus filled.

3) Phymatous rosacea: This type is actually associated with another condition called rhinophyma which is an enlargement of the nose. This has many symptoms such as thickening skin, irregular surface nodularities and enlargement. This can affect the chin, forehead, nose, eyelids and ears. Small blood vessels may be visible along the skin surface as well.

4) Ocular rosacea: This will cause red, dry and irritated eyes and eyelids.

Although these are the four main subtypes that occur in most people, there are variations and any condition should be consulted by a doctor (such as a dermatologist) before pursuing any treatment options.

The “Why”

It is natural to want to understand why a certain condition has developed. Although some conditions can be prevented with proper skin care and diet, others are inherited or develop because of factors beyond our control. Rosacea has many sources that have been identified by researchers over the years including: sun exposure, emotional stress, hot weather, wind, heavy exercise, alcohol consumption, hot baths, cold weather, spicy foods, humidity, indoor heat, certain skin care products, some foods, etc.
It is easy to see that sometimes identifying the exact source of rosacea can be problematic. But since it is an inflammation of the skin, most topical treatments can assist in controlling the condition and reducing the appearance and symptoms. Severe conditions may require prescriptions from a doctor for treatment.

The “Who”

Rosacea primarily occurs in Caucasian or fair skinned people of North Eastern European descent but it is not restricted to this. It occurs in both men and women but women are three times more likely to develop this condition. Primary onset occurs between the ages of 30 and 60.

The “How”

So how can you treat rosacea once it occurs? From the list of causes you have probably surmised that the initial onset will need to be treated after the fact and not as a preventative approach. Topical treatments are most common and applied directly to this skin to reduce the inflammation and soothe any irritation. Depending on the severity of the condition, normal cosmetics may be sufficient to cover the redness with no additional treatment required.
Rosacea is not a “curative” condition and may go through periods of inflammation and flair ups. Short term treatments may provide short term relief but the condition could reoccur as soon as treatment has been discontinued. Long term treatments are usually required to maintain control over rosacea.

What to Try

Try a simple but effective topical treatment that is applied directly to the face for relief from the inflammation. A wonderful choice is the RosaCalm, a unique marine complex combined with willow herb and oat beta-glucan help to reduce the appearance of facial redness and calm reactive skin with continued daily use.

Final Thoughts

Although rosacea is an irritating an ongoing condition for most, there are ways to control the problem and find relief. Remember that proper skin care is a lifelong commitment and needs to be fine tuned and developed for your individual skin type and needs. Consult with a dermatologist or esthetician to find the products that will best suit your needs and take control of your rosacea today!

Have you ever even heard of milia? Probably not, although it is a very common skin condition that effects everyone from infants to the elderly. Basically it is tiny white bumps on the skin. Just like any other skin condition there are several different types and treatments available to help you banish the bumps from sight!

Milia are asymptomatic and usually occur around the eyes in children and adults. Up to half of infants in the United States develop milia at some point. In appearance they are small skin lesions (bumps) that range from pearly white to pale yellow in appearance.

Primary milia are most typically seen in infants but may occur in adults. This type typically forms around the nose and eye region. Secondary milia are seen in different blistering disorders or following dermabrasion. Milia are tiny epideremoid cysts that may be may be derived from the pilosebaceous follicle.

Causes

Primary milia may be the result of sebaceous glands that are not fully developed (thus explaining its massive occurrence during infancy). Secondary milia form following blistering or trauma and disruption to the sweat glands. This type can also develop following skin treatments such as dermabrasion or radiotherapy.

Treatment

The most important thing to remember about milia is that they are completely harmless. As a parent it may be tempting to seek treatment for your child’s skin but left alone it will treat itself over time. Basically it is tiny pockets of dead skin cells on the surface and through the natural exfoliation process and building of new skin cells, skin will heal itself and the tiny bumps will disappear.

It is important to remember that milia is not like acne and should not be “pinched” or “popped”. This could lead to significant scarring when done, especially at home. If you are very concerned over the bumps on your skin or wish to seek treatment, consult with your dermatologist.

Prevention

The best way to treat milia is to prevent it from ever developing. This is not true in the case of infant milia – an infants skin is very delicate and should not be exposed to excess cleansers or treatments. Consult with your child’s physician before taking any action.

For teens and adults a gentle exfoliation can help in the prevention of milia but will not clear up the condition once it has developed. A gentle exfoliant will help soften the skin and ease the natural exfoliation process and prevent the build up of more dead skin cells. Remember that your skin is sensitive and should not be exposed to harsh chemicals or rough scrubbing as this will only cause more damage and trauma. (Over exfoliation may actually increase the occurrence of milia on the skin so use good judgment when developing a skin care routine).

Want to learn more about proper skin care? Find us online at http://www.bellaninainstitute.com.

Winter is coming and that means cold temperatures, wind and oh yes, chapped lips. Dry skin may be the most frequent skin condition to flair up in the general population during these colder months because of the sudden drop in humidity and overexposure to those dry winter winds. Although this can be an annoying and unattractive problem, it is generally easy to treat and clears up quickly.

So what are “chapped” lips anyway? Chapped skin is tissue that lacks proper moisture and literally dries out. The dry skin develops fine lines, tiny cracks and can become red or irritated when left untreated. People who have chronic dry lips due to allergies or perhaps frequently lick their lips can develop chapped lips all year round.

Without treatment chapped lips can become uncomfortable or even painful. As the dry tissue begins to develop tiny cracks it can lead to irritation and even infection over time. Remember that any cut that is exposed to bacteria is at risk for infection and the mouth and face is a notorious “hot spot” for germs and bacteria.

Treating the problem is a simple process but does require frequent application throughout the entire day. A simple lip balm is the best remedy for chapped skin because it contains wax or lanolin that will seal in moisture and provide a protective barrier for the skin to heal. This is almost in place of applying a band aid over a paper cut. Sealing in moisture will allow the skin to begin the process of re-hydrating. Since chapped lips can be a chronic problem in winter, it is smart to apply a lip balm before going outside even if you do not have chapped lips. The thick coating will lock out the drier air and keep your lips feeling their best.

Tips to prevent chapping:

During the winter apply lip balm daily to prevent chapping from occurring.
Once chapped lips have formed, apply lip balm frequently throughout the day (especially after eating or any activity where the lip balm might have been diminished or removed)
Avoid “flavored” lips balms if you are prone to licking your lips or when applying lip balm to children. This will not only remove the balm entirely but increase the dryness at the same time.
Cover up your lips when going outside – even if it is only for a few minutes. A simple scarf or ski mask will protect your lips, cheeks and nose from the dry air.

Want more great tips on beating the winter dry skin battle? Check us out online at http://www.bellaninainstitute.com!

No one likes to be judged by their skin but when you suffer from oily skin it can be particularly worrisome because of all the problems that can come with it. Waking up with fresh new blemishes, an unnatural shine to your skin and a greasy feeling are all unfortunate outcomes. Although some people have oily skin naturally, there are steps you can take to minimize the effects and reverse some of the problematic issues (such as blackheads and pimples).
Before looking into how to solve the problem, let’s take a moment to examine the root causes. By understanding what produces oily skin, you can better develop an effective treatment plan. In its simplest definition, oily skin is caused by overactive oil glands in the skin producing too much of your skin’s natural moisturizer, sebum. While it is important to have these natural oils to prevent dryness and cracking, it is important to control the amount of oil present at any given time. It is the build up of natural oils that leads to some of the main complaints people have about their skin.

Now that we have a basis for why this problem is occurring, what is the solution? Just as oil and water don’t mix in a bowl, water will not solve the oily residue problem on your face either. Patience is essential when trying to resolve any skin care issue and when it comes to oily skin, understanding that you may need to develop a permanent skin care regimen to prevent build up is important too. Oily skin issues may never be “fixed” but they can be maintained.
Cleansing your face with products specifically geared to your skin type will be the first and most important step you can take. Not all skin care products are designed to treat oily skin and some cleansers contain fatty acids that may actually make the condition worse so search carefully. Products containing Alpha Hydroxy Acids are designed to gently exfoliate the skin and will help to remove dead skin cells and build up on the face.
The less product containing oils and creams you apply to your face, the better off you will be. Most make ups and lotions contain oils and other ingredients that already clog the pores for someone without oily skin, by adding more oils on a regular basis; you are essentially adding fuel to a fire. If you can avoid it, try to limit your use of cosmetics and oil based products or search for specially formulated brands designated as oil-free.
By removing the excess oil, dirt and grime from your face on a regular basis you are already going to see some of the benefits of your labor. Of course as we stated earlier, the skin does need some oil to remain healthy and hydrated so after any cleansing or exfoliating it is important to follow that with an oil free moisturizer. The last thing you want to do is stimulate your glands to produce more oil to compensate for a lack of hydration in the skin cells.
With any skin care routine it is important to test products carefully and pay attention to your skins reaction. Any redness, itchy or irritation means you should discontinue use immediately and consult with your doctor about a possible allergy. If you have a particularly severe case of oily skin and over the counter remedies have not worked in the past, check with an esthetician or dermatologist regarding professional grade products.
Oily skin doesn’t have to make you self conscious any longer as long as you are patient and willing to take steps to control it before it controls you.