Archives for posts with tag: sensitive skin

Protect your face from the sun by wearing sunblock. Apply moisturizer on your hands after washing to restore lost hydration. Exfoliate your body during your shower or bath to remove dead skin cells.

All this is wonderful advice but when is the last time someone told you to take care of your elbows?

elbow2

Elbows, that’s right. This skin is exposed to just as much (if not more) damage as the rest of your body but is      usually overlooked when you begin to develop a skin care routine.

Take a look at your elbows now: is the skin dry, rough, or even darker in color than the rest of your arm? Do      you routinely lean your elbow against a desk or wall? How often do you take the time to really moisturize your elbows at night or in the morning?

The skin on your elbows is thicker to protect your elbow bone. It is much thicker than the skin around your eyes, for example. This means that it is designed to withstand more exposure to abusive activities but it does not mean it is immune to being damaged as a result.

Thicker skin is more prone to dryness, especially in the winter. Add to that exposure to rough surfaces such as wood or plastic (from leaning on a desk perhaps?) or even your clothes can all cause your skin to become dry and rough.

The solution?

Usually a regular moisturizer won’t be a remedy since this skin is so thick. It requires extra care. So the first step is to remember to EXFOLIATE your elbows in the shower. Exfoliation removes the built up dead skin cells. A proper skin care routine should routinely exfoliate your skin (the whole body, not just the face) every other day.

Deep treatment is usually needed to reverse the existing damage to your elbows. Petroleum jelly is a wonderful (and inexpensive) way to help restore lost moisture. Apply a thick coat to your elbows at night (cover with a cloth to protect your sheets – an old sock with the toes cut off would work wonderfully) and repeat for 5-10 days.

After 5-10 days, apply a body lotion (avoid any containing alcohol as this can irritate and dry skin out) every day. Remember to keep exfoliating your skin to prevent a reoccurrence.

Still not working?

You may need to check with a dermatologist to rule out any other skin concerns or conditions which may be resulting in dry skin. A dermatologist can prescribe stronger treatments to help reduce dryness and reverse the problem if there is an underlying medical condition.

Final thoughts

Treat your skin with love and care – remember that proper daily skin care can prevent signs of aging and more serious skin conditions from developing. As we age, your skin will require more care to maintain a healthy, youthful glow but when incorporated as part of your daily routine (like working out) the benefits will far outweigh the time you need to spend maintaining your skin every day. Learn more online at www.bellaninainstitute.com.

Sensitive skin has become one of those “catch all” phrases that describes a variety of things but does not carry a clear definition. Millions of people have sensitive skin but what does that mean exactly? Do they react badly to skin care protects? Are they especially affected by exposure to the sun? Do certain types of fabrics cause problems?

It’s easy to understand why the term “sensitive skin” may carry different meanings for different people. For example: if someone is complaining about sensitive skin to their esthetician, do they mean they are allergic to certain products or perhaps their skin simply reacts to certain ingredients more intensely than most people do. With so much variation in how a person may define their “sensitive” skin, it is important to understand how they are defining the term, sensitive.

Acne or Rosacea: Skin that is especially sensitive to products may react by producing acne or inflaming an existing rosacea condition. Excessive oils in products can easily clog the pores for people with this type of sensitivity. Instead of using products specially designed for “sensitive skin”, search for the underlying problem such as oily skin or inflamed skin.

Burning and Stinging: Some people apply a skin care product and immediately (or even after a few minutes) begin to experience a “burning or stinging” sensation on the face. This is not necessarily the same as an allergic reaction. Usually the cause of this sensation cannot be pinned down and remains unknown. Some ingredients have been known to cause this reaction more frequently including: lactic acid, azaelic acid, benzoic acid, glycolic acid, vitamin c and AHA’s.
A dermatologist may perform a test (once again, not an allergy test) to determine which ingredient the skin in reacting to so a patient can avoid products that will invoke a reaction. Currently there is no substantive research to determine why the skin will responds this way or a treatment that will work for everyone when it occurs. Usually removal of the product will reduce the sensation and it will go away on its own after a few minutes to several hours (depending on the original application amount).

Contact Dermatitis (Allergies): Finally, the issue most people refer to when they talk about sensitive skin. This refers to a specific allergy to a product, material or ingredient that causes an adverse reaction. An allergen is a reaction to a specific ingredient which your body is producing anti-bodies to combat the reaction. This is not the same as an irritant which will cause a reaction when applied to the skin (such as bleach on skin) but your body is not actively fighting as an allergy.

Trying to Determine the Cause: When a dermatologist is searching for the cause of an allergic reaction, they will need to rely heavily on a patient’s history to narrow down possible suspects. Remember, doctors need complete disclosure of any product usage to obtain accurate results. When you withhold critical information for one reason or another, it prolongs the process and could lead to misdiagnosis and unnecessary additional tests to find an unknown cause.

Avoiding the Problem: If you are shopping for new products or want to undergo any skin care treatment, make sure to inform your esthetician of any adverse reactions you’ve had prior to your appointment. This will prevent complications when specialized products are used. Remember that many spa products use higher concentrations of ingredients to obtain more dramatic results so telling your esthetician in advance can prevent a severe reaction.

Conclusion: Searching for products geared towards “sensitive skin” can be a waste of time and money if you don’t know to root of your problem. Determining a true allergy versus and irritation can help resolve a lot of mystery and ensure you have proper treatment should an allergic reaction occur. Remember that not all skin reactions require medical attention but if you have any concerns or contact with potentially dangerous materials, contact your primary care physician immediately. A referral to a skin care specialist may be necessary for especially sensitive care cases or concerns.

Learn more great skin care tips online at http://www.bellaninainstitute.com.

Walking through an average cosmetic or health care aisle can be a wild adventure as well as an educational experience. The shelves are lined with mysterious concoctions, all claiming to be the miracle cure for your skin. These special brews come complete with fancy containers, shiny labels and seven syllable words to boggle your mind. Venture closer to these magic elixirs and notice the fine print:

Normal skin
Dry Skin
Oily Skin
Sensitive Skin
Combination

You feel your fingers moving up to your cheek as you wonder; what skin type am I? What if I have sensitive skin and just don’t know it? Does one dry patch mean I need dry skin care? Will products meant for oily skin completely ruin my face?

The list of questions can go on and on with no end in sight until you realize that you can come to this mysterious world armed with knowledge and ready to go to battle. Choose wisely and you will benefit greatly from your decision. Choose poorly and you will need to return and choose again.

Normal Skin

First of all remove “normal” and insert “average”. People with other skin types are not “abnormal” and should not feel as such. Millions of people have each skin type listed and there are products specially targeted for each type.

A product labeled “normal skin” is intended for use on healthy, hydrated, even toned skin with small pores and no history of irritation from skin care products. The skin retains good elasticity, good complexion and there are no blemishes.

Most “normal skin” targeted products can be used on all skin types but may not produced treatment effects for certain skin issues.

Oily Skin

Perhaps one of the more dreaded skin types to have because of the negative connotations associated with it and potential self consciousness it can create. The result of overactive sebaceous (oil-producing) glands, this skin type can appear quite shiny, feel slightly greasy to the touch and is prone to acne and enlarged pores.

Products targeted for this skin type typically contain ingredients meant to cleanse the pores, exfoliate the skin and remove the excess oil and grime build up. These products would not be very beneficial for people with dry skin.

Dry Skin

Dry skin can be the result of genetics, the environment, exposure to chemicals and a variety of other causes. Dry skin is trademarked by tiny pores, flaky or ashy texture, fine lines and wrinkles and/or cracked skin.

Products for dry skin focus on re-hydrating the skin cells and stimulating healthy skin cells to develop. Many products will contain fat-soluble ingredients that penetrate the skin’s outer layer to reach the interior layers to replenish moisture from within. Exfoliants are used to shed away dead skin cells build up and reduce flaky texture.

Combination

As the name suggests, this skin type is a combination of the three above. Meaning it is possible (and frequent) to have normal skin with an oily “t-zone” which is the bridge of the nose and forehead. Perhaps dry lips with normal skin or dry forehead but the rest of your face is normal.

This skin type generally uses spot specific treatments to correct problem areas and “normal skin” care products for the rest of the face. This could include blemish control for oily areas if needed, masques for application on the t-zone, special creams for the eyes or lips, etc. Consult with an esthetician or dermatologist if you need more help creating an effective skin care routine.

Sensitive Skin

Sensitive skin is very typically dry and very reactive to heat, cold and any substances used on it. That can include all skin products, hair products and chemicals. Irritation may include rash, hives, itching, redness and swelling.

These skin care products are specially designed to omit using chemicals known to irritate sensitive skin but cannot be guaranteed. People with especially reactive skin should always consult with a doctor before beginning any new skin care treatment. Discontinue use of products at the first sign of negative reaction and take precaution by always wearing sun block to protect the sensitive tissue.

Final Thoughts

Have you figured out where you’re at yet and what to buy? Don’t be ashamed if you don’t have “normal skin” because the truth of the matter is, most people don’t. Focus on what problem areas you would like to focus on and choose a skin care routine that will be easy to maintain long term. The most important issue in skin care is persistence and maintenance. You must follow your individual plan every day and stick with it for your entire life. That is not meant to sound like a prison sentence, merely a reminder that skin care is not something you can do occasionally and expect to see real results.

Developing and maintaining a facial skin care routine is a wonderful way to take steps towards a life of beautiful and healthy skin. Did you know that over time the accumulation of dead skin, grime and impurities as well as exposure to sun and other natural elements can take a drastic toll on your skins health? While your skin is designed to protect your body, it needs to be protected as well. By incorporating a few simple steps into your morning or nightly routine, you can banish away the detrimental effects of the environment and the natural aging process simply and effectively.

Remember that your skin, especially your face, is constantly exposed to elements you may not even be aware are around you. Even something as simple as the wind on your face or rubbing your fingers over your skin will leave tiny particles of dirt and grime behind. Your skin has pores that can become filled with these particles and slowly become clogged with oils that will lead to acne, white heads, black heads and other skin problems. The accumulation of dead skin cells that have not been removed will build up over time and begin forming wrinkles and prevent healthy new cells from reaching the surface. By ignoring your skin, you are setting the stage for a lifelong battle with the look and feel of your face and body.

A simple skin care routine is simple to establish and can be custom tailored to your particular needs. Understanding your skin type is the first step followed by identifying any specific problem areas. There are five common types of skin:

1) Normal
2) Oily
3) Dry
4) Combination (a mixture of two or more of the previous three)
5) Sensitive (may not respond well to more aggressive treatments)

Common problems associated with a lack of good skin care include the previously mentioned issues such as acne (caused by build of grime and clogged pores), premature or deep wrinkles from sun exposure or the accumulation of dead skin or discoloration or hyper pigmentation (moles, freckles, uneven color and tone). More serious problems can develop if healthy skin cannot properly grow and mature including certain types of cancer.

After you have identified what type of skin you have and any specific issues you may want to correct, it is time to develop your routine. Most daily skin care treatments can be done daily or every other day (cleanse, tone, moisturize). More intensive treatments such as masques or exfoliation may only be done on a weekly or bi-weekly basis. Corrective treatments can range in duration and frequency and individual product directions should be followed carefully.

Step One: Cleanser (Daily)
The first and most basic step should be to truly clean your face (and not with just soap and water). A basic cleanser (they are available for all skin types) will remove excess oils and dirt from the pores by penetrating the skin more deeply. Most cleansers are rubbed in a circular motion around the skin and then rinsed off with warm water.

Step Two: Exfoliate (Daily or Every Other Day)
Remember when we said that by removing dead skin you can allow new skin cells to develop? This is where this step comes in handy. Exfoliants range from gentle in texture (small and grainy like sand) to more intensive treatments with larger particles that are closer to salt crystals. If you are unsure of what type is best for your skin, consult with an esthetician or dermatologist for more advice.

Step Three: Tone (Daily or Every Other Day)
After cleansing the skin and exfoliating it is important to make sure that all the excess grime has been removed. After exfoliating the pores, toner can reach further and remove any residual impurities that may remain. It will also help to restore the natural ph balance of the skin.

Step Four: Correct (As Directed)
Blemish repair, hyper pigmentation treatment, anti wrinkle or deep exfoliation would fall into this step as needed. These treatments are very specific to your skin and will help to combat any existing conditions.

Step Five: Moisturize (Daily)
Moisture, moisture, moisture! This cannot be repeated enough when it comes to proper skin care. Even if your skin is naturally oily in nature it will still need a light (oil free) moisturizer to maintain a hydrated and healthy appearance. Dry skin will use more intensive moisturizers while sensitive skin may require special products without harsh chemical additives. Pay attention to any reactions such as redness, dryness or rash, when using any product and discontinue immediately if any problems arise.

Step Six: Protect (As Needed)
If you are going out during the day (even in the winter) it is important to prevent damage before it starts by using a strong sun block. We recommend the use of at least an SPF 30 or higher and reapplying often throughout the day or after any activities such as swimming. Advanced protection is available for the face, lips and body in several strengths and types.

Take control of your skin today and start a daily routine that will help to improve the texture, smoothness and tone of your skin from day one. Problematic skin doesn’t need to be a losing battle if you are ready to take matters into your own hands and commit to a simple plan to keep your skin looking its best. Most daily routines can be completed within ten minutes and will significantly improve your skin’s health and appearance quickly and effectively.

Want to learn more? Visit us online at http://www.bellanina.com