Archives for posts with tag: esthetician

Are you a massage therapist, esthetician or health/wellness provider seeking a way to build your business and learn a new technique that is less stressful on your body and beneficial for your clients?  Perhaps you are already a Bellanina Facelift Massage Practitioner who is looking for CEs in 2013.

Look no further than the Bellanina Facelift Massage! In 2011, Bellanina  “enhanced” their signature technique by incorporating Thai massage, acupressure and a full body energy release into their already time-tested approach to holistic skin care.  Our homestudy course is NCBTMB approved for 16 CE credits for all new students and for returning practitioners who want to learn the new and improved protocol.

Imagine an all natural, holistic approach to obtaining and maintaining younger, smoother and healthier looking skin at any age. The Bellanina Facelift Massage is the answer you have been looking for to decrease the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles, tone facial muscles and release unblock stuck energy.

 Since 1989, the Bellanina Facelift Massage has been utilized by thousands of clients around the world. We have seen some amazing results including:

Decrease in bags under the eyes 

Firmer cheeks and jaw line

Neck appears smoother

Naso-labial fold lines soften

Skin looks smoother and skin tone evens

Youthful glow

Our clients tell us that the Bellanina Facelift Massage has been the best choice they have made to improve the look and feel of their skin!
                

Before & After (untouched photos)

What our students say…..
“I have taken many modalities as a massage therapist, reflexologist, etc., but your course hands down has such a fantastic income potential. In addition, I find it very creative and the results are amazing. I have done “Bellanina” on all ages, even those women who are in their 70’s and think this is it and they better make the best of what they have and then there is “Bellanina Facelift Massage.” I have a client who is 76 years old, when I finish the Bellanina Facelift Massage, her attitude and feeling of self worth becomes transformed. She told me, “I feel beautiful!”. I just wanted to share that with you and THANK YOU 100 times over for giving me the opportunity of learning and being certified as a “Bellanina Facelift Specialist”.Lauretta I, New York

Several times each month – Nina Howard (Bellanina Founder) hosts a FREE educational webiner at 3:30 P.M (EST) to explain the many benefits of Bellanina Facelift Massage, how this technique can build your business and answer all your questions at the end!

Visit our website www.bellaninainstitute.com to register for this event! Remember, this is a FREE webinar with master trainer, Nina Howard and a chance to learn about the most exciting approach to skin care available today!

Knowing the benefits of certain skin care products will benefit estheticians and their clients. With so many corrective skin care ingredients on the market today, it may be difficult to keep track of which products will give your client the desired effect they are looking for. Staying on top of the latest trends and most effective treatment options will increase your credibility as a skin care professional and help you to increase clientele by offering the truly effective skin care solutions they desire.

Salicylic Acid has roots going back to Hippocrates in ancient Greece. Originally derived from the bark of a willow tree, salicylic acid offers many benefits for corrective skin care. Primarily it is used to aid the natural exfoliation process skin undergoes and reduce blemishes and acne prone skin types by clearing the pores of excess build up.

Salicylic acid is usually produced synthetically now from aspirin. Because it comes from aspirin, it carries many of the anti-inflammatory benefits as well. In terms of skin care, this means a reduction in redness and swelling of acne. This helps to reduce acne, prevent new acne from developing and decreases the likelihood of scarring. It is also oil-soluble which means it can penetrate the oil in your skin and remove grime and build up from the pores more easily than other water based skin care ingredients.

Another great benefit of using salicylic acid for acne treatment is its anti bacterial qualities. It is the bacteria residing in the pores causes inflammation and “white heads” to develop. By removing the bacteria, it will help to clear up this type of acne and decrease the chance of it returning.

There are many treatment options available at home or through an esthetician. Most commonly used as a topical treatment in skin care, salicylic acid is applied to the face with a clean pad and left on to provide a gentle peel for the face. Peels should be left to the supervision of an esthetician or skin care professional to prevent any damage or harmful results but a daily salicylic treatment (which involves applying salicylic treatment to the face) can be beneficial, especially if your skin is naturally very oily.

As with any ingredient, your skin may react with a slight stinging sensation if it is applied to broken and/or affected areas. This is not harmful but the product should be immediately removed if there is any further reaction such as burning, redness, rash, etc. This could be a sign of an allergic reaction and you should seek medical advice immediately if this happens for treatment options.

Salicylic acid treatments are not recommended for everyone. Most over the counter products contain a 1-2% solution that is typically safe for most consumers and skin types. If you have any of the following conditions, consult with a dermatologist before using salicylic based products:
Blood Vessel Disease
Diabetes Mellitus
Acute skin inflammation or infection
You have recently used Accutane

It should also be noted that salicylic acid is not recommended during pregnancy. Although there has been no evidence of birth defects from use, it is still not recommended.

Learning about skin care products and their active ingredients is an important practice for any skin care professional or consumer. The skin absorbs what is applied to it into the body so having a working knowledge of any potential side effects or damaging effects is essential for better skin care and knowing what to do in case of any negative reactions.

Learn more about salicylic acid at www.bellaninainstitute.com.

As a massage therapist or wellness practitioner you may struggle with constant questions about whether or not it would behoove you to expand your skill set and learn new techniques to offer your clientele. It is easy to argue both sides of the matter since learning new skills often requires a commitment of time, money and effort with no absolute 100% guarantee that it will work out. Looking at the situation that way, it is no wonder so many people end up in a professional “rut”.

So what are the two sides of this particular issue?

The question boils down to one simple matter: if you take the time to learn something new, will your clients want this new service? Which of course leads to further questions about expanding your business in the future.

If you are worried that adding new services may alienate your existing clientele, don’t. Experience has taught many practitioners first hand that new services are often more exciting to existing clients than they are to the practitioner! Remember, a massage or facial is a treat and finding something new on the menu can be a great way to mix up an old routine for you and your client. Keeping your service menu fresh and updated will encourage your clients to come back for more. Although you may have some that resist change, they can always stay with their tried and true without harm to your business.

What about attracting new clients? An important part of business growth is knowing how to reach new clientele. Offering the “basic” services everyone already expects from a masseuse or wellness practitioner will not put you ahead of the pack. In fact, not branching out can hurt your business as it may appear out of day or obsolete. We are a culture that thrives on change and innovation – two concepts that do not rhyme with stagnation.

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Continuing education classes have never been more available or adaptable to your schedule. Many courses are available as a seminar or even a home study course for you to learn on your own time. Taking the effort to expand your professional career and techniques will benefit you as a business owner or as a employee. The more you know and the better you market yourself as a specialized expert, the better your business will be.

Take a chance this year and try something new to shake up your business. The Bellanina Facelift Massage continuing education course is a great way to entice existing clientele to try something new, encourage repeat business and market to a new and expanding market base. As the baby boomer generation grows older, they will be looking for treatments that are non-invasive and effective. The Bellanina Facelift Massage is time tested and can offer an amazing choice for your clients.

Contact Bellanina Institute today to learn more or to register for your seminar today. Bellanina Facelift Massage home study course is approved by the NCBTMB for 16 continuing education credit hours and the 3 day seminar is approved for 24 continuing education hours.

Have you ever even heard of milia? Probably not, although it is a very common skin condition that effects everyone from infants to the elderly. Basically it is tiny white bumps on the skin. Just like any other skin condition there are several different types and treatments available to help you banish the bumps from sight!

Milia are asymptomatic and usually occur around the eyes in children and adults. Up to half of infants in the United States develop milia at some point. In appearance they are small skin lesions (bumps) that range from pearly white to pale yellow in appearance.

Primary milia are most typically seen in infants but may occur in adults. This type typically forms around the nose and eye region. Secondary milia are seen in different blistering disorders or following dermabrasion. Milia are tiny epideremoid cysts that may be may be derived from the pilosebaceous follicle.

Causes

Primary milia may be the result of sebaceous glands that are not fully developed (thus explaining its massive occurrence during infancy). Secondary milia form following blistering or trauma and disruption to the sweat glands. This type can also develop following skin treatments such as dermabrasion or radiotherapy.

Treatment

The most important thing to remember about milia is that they are completely harmless. As a parent it may be tempting to seek treatment for your child’s skin but left alone it will treat itself over time. Basically it is tiny pockets of dead skin cells on the surface and through the natural exfoliation process and building of new skin cells, skin will heal itself and the tiny bumps will disappear.

It is important to remember that milia is not like acne and should not be “pinched” or “popped”. This could lead to significant scarring when done, especially at home. If you are very concerned over the bumps on your skin or wish to seek treatment, consult with your dermatologist.

Prevention

The best way to treat milia is to prevent it from ever developing. This is not true in the case of infant milia – an infants skin is very delicate and should not be exposed to excess cleansers or treatments. Consult with your child’s physician before taking any action.

For teens and adults a gentle exfoliation can help in the prevention of milia but will not clear up the condition once it has developed. A gentle exfoliant will help soften the skin and ease the natural exfoliation process and prevent the build up of more dead skin cells. Remember that your skin is sensitive and should not be exposed to harsh chemicals or rough scrubbing as this will only cause more damage and trauma. (Over exfoliation may actually increase the occurrence of milia on the skin so use good judgment when developing a skin care routine).

Want to learn more about proper skin care? Find us online at http://www.bellaninainstitute.com.

As an esthetician or skin care professional, you may have heard some controversy over the matter of performing extractions during a routine facial service. What may seem like a relatively simple procedure can actually raise great controversy in the world of esthetics. Some estheticians regard extractions as a matter of providing a complete service while others see this as inflicting trauma to the skin. Learning more about both sides of the issue can help you as a professional in making an informed decision and explaining the issue to your clients.

What is an extraction?

As a basic review, an extraction is removing impurity (plug of dead skin or oil) from a pore or pimple. It is the removal of both blackheads and whiteheads from the skin. Extractions occur after the skin has been thoroughly cleansed, exfoliated and sometimes steamed to soften the area prior to extraction.

Why Do It?

Extractions are considered a “must” by many estheticians when performing a routine facial because they want to leave their clients skin looking and feeling it’s best. When done correctly, a simple extraction should be quick and relatively painless. As a trained esthetician it is important to know if your client has sensitive skin which would make them more prone to the damage that can be caused by extractions.

Why Not?

Extractions should only be performed by a trained esthetician and should not be done in excess. Extractions can cause broken capillaries or sin irritations that can lead to more (not less) breakouts. Extractions can also cause discomfort for your client when done incorrectly so you should seek their permission before performing any type of extraction during their facial. Remember your client has the right to know any product or procedure being performed on their skin and make an informed choice.

Who Decides?

As an esthetician it may be entirely up to you or it may be a procedure within your salon to do or not do extractions. It is important to check the guidelines of your employer and know their policies before performing any procedure. Remember to explain extractions and their benefits and possible complications to your client. Trust is an important part of any relationship and your client needs to know you are being open and honest with them. The last thing you want as a professional is a reputation for inflicting unnecessary and unwanted procedures or damage to your client’s skin.

For more great information about home skin care products and acne treatments, check us out online at http://www.bellaninainstitute.com!

Walking through an average cosmetic or health care aisle can be a wild adventure as well as an educational experience. The shelves are lined with mysterious concoctions, all claiming to be the miracle cure for your skin. These special brews come complete with fancy containers, shiny labels and seven syllable words to boggle your mind. Venture closer to these magic elixirs and notice the fine print:

Normal skin
Dry Skin
Oily Skin
Sensitive Skin
Combination

You feel your fingers moving up to your cheek as you wonder; what skin type am I? What if I have sensitive skin and just don’t know it? Does one dry patch mean I need dry skin care? Will products meant for oily skin completely ruin my face?

The list of questions can go on and on with no end in sight until you realize that you can come to this mysterious world armed with knowledge and ready to go to battle. Choose wisely and you will benefit greatly from your decision. Choose poorly and you will need to return and choose again.

Normal Skin

First of all remove “normal” and insert “average”. People with other skin types are not “abnormal” and should not feel as such. Millions of people have each skin type listed and there are products specially targeted for each type.

A product labeled “normal skin” is intended for use on healthy, hydrated, even toned skin with small pores and no history of irritation from skin care products. The skin retains good elasticity, good complexion and there are no blemishes.

Most “normal skin” targeted products can be used on all skin types but may not produced treatment effects for certain skin issues.

Oily Skin

Perhaps one of the more dreaded skin types to have because of the negative connotations associated with it and potential self consciousness it can create. The result of overactive sebaceous (oil-producing) glands, this skin type can appear quite shiny, feel slightly greasy to the touch and is prone to acne and enlarged pores.

Products targeted for this skin type typically contain ingredients meant to cleanse the pores, exfoliate the skin and remove the excess oil and grime build up. These products would not be very beneficial for people with dry skin.

Dry Skin

Dry skin can be the result of genetics, the environment, exposure to chemicals and a variety of other causes. Dry skin is trademarked by tiny pores, flaky or ashy texture, fine lines and wrinkles and/or cracked skin.

Products for dry skin focus on re-hydrating the skin cells and stimulating healthy skin cells to develop. Many products will contain fat-soluble ingredients that penetrate the skin’s outer layer to reach the interior layers to replenish moisture from within. Exfoliants are used to shed away dead skin cells build up and reduce flaky texture.

Combination

As the name suggests, this skin type is a combination of the three above. Meaning it is possible (and frequent) to have normal skin with an oily “t-zone” which is the bridge of the nose and forehead. Perhaps dry lips with normal skin or dry forehead but the rest of your face is normal.

This skin type generally uses spot specific treatments to correct problem areas and “normal skin” care products for the rest of the face. This could include blemish control for oily areas if needed, masques for application on the t-zone, special creams for the eyes or lips, etc. Consult with an esthetician or dermatologist if you need more help creating an effective skin care routine.

Sensitive Skin

Sensitive skin is very typically dry and very reactive to heat, cold and any substances used on it. That can include all skin products, hair products and chemicals. Irritation may include rash, hives, itching, redness and swelling.

These skin care products are specially designed to omit using chemicals known to irritate sensitive skin but cannot be guaranteed. People with especially reactive skin should always consult with a doctor before beginning any new skin care treatment. Discontinue use of products at the first sign of negative reaction and take precaution by always wearing sun block to protect the sensitive tissue.

Final Thoughts

Have you figured out where you’re at yet and what to buy? Don’t be ashamed if you don’t have “normal skin” because the truth of the matter is, most people don’t. Focus on what problem areas you would like to focus on and choose a skin care routine that will be easy to maintain long term. The most important issue in skin care is persistence and maintenance. You must follow your individual plan every day and stick with it for your entire life. That is not meant to sound like a prison sentence, merely a reminder that skin care is not something you can do occasionally and expect to see real results.

Winter is coming and that means falling snow, holidays, sled rides and…..dry skin. Every winter thousands of people dread the appearance or worsening of their dry skin symptoms and seek new ways to beat this powerful foe. This year, take control of your skin and don’t let itchy and flaky skin put a damper on your winter wonderland.

Dry or itchy skin is a common condition that can occur all year round but peaks during the colder months when there is a drop in the humidity. Normally healthy and hydrated skin becomes dry, cracked and flaky. Mature skin may show increased fine lines and wrinkles due to the lack of moisture. For the most part, dry skin effects the arms, hands, legs and feet but can also occur on the trunk of the body or even the face (chapped lips anyone?).

The most common complaint when suffering from “winter skin” is a persistent itchiness that can be made worse when in contact with fabrics or liquids. Over time excessive cracking can and will lead to thick and rough patches of skin (called lichenification). This thicker skin not only develops lines and wrinkles but is prone to developing painful cracks (fissures) that may result in bleeding and irritated skin. Severe skin conditions can result from bacterial infections that can develop because of these and other conditions such as nummular eczema (red, scaly patches of skin) or dermatitis (inflamed skin).

The potential outcomes of winter skin are enough to take notice and take action before things get out of hand. Always remember that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure and that is especially true in health care. Developing a proper skin care routine and faithfully maintaining a schedule will reduce your chances of developing winter skin this season.

Why does winter skin develop in the first place? The cells in the outermost layer of your skin are designed to protect the body and hold in the water to hydrate the interior layers. Loss of this water prevents the outer layer from doing its job and soon the moisture your skin so desperately needs to stay healthy slips away and you are left with dry and unhealthy skin. This can occur from over washing the hands (a frequent problem in the nursing field), exposure to harsh chemicals, changes in humidity and the natural aging process are all frequent culprits. Although some people naturally have “dry skin” and suffer this problem all the time.

Treatment options are available and can be quite effective in preventing or relieving the symptoms of winter skin. Water is not the solution and can frequently worsen the problem, not solve it so step away from the sink! A good moisturizer however is a great way to penetrate the skin and trap moisture in so the skin becomes smooth and supple. Choose a moisturizer specifically designed to target dry skin and use it regularly. If you have more severe symptoms, consult with a doctor and discuss potential treatment options – dry skin can sometimes require pharmaceutical grade products that are not available over the counter. Not all over the counter products to treat itchiness are safe to use on irritated skin so consult with a doctor or pharmacist before use.

Increase the humidity in your home or office if possible. There is no way to change the environment outside but by making strides to limit your exposure to the dry air, the better your skin will feel. Humidifiers are readily available in most local stores and online.

Remember to use sun block, even in the winter. Some sun blocks include a moisturizer along with SPF protection so you would receive double benefits! If you are outside, cover up your skin and limit sun exposure when possible. Just because it’s cold doesn’t mean your skin is not suffering from UV radiation.

Cover up your hands when you go outside and remove wet articles of clothing as soon as possible. The skin on your hands is some of the thinnest skin on your body and cannot bear being constantly exposed during the winter months! Stay warm and protect your skin!

Avoid skin treatments that will exfoliate or strip the skin of essential oils if possible. Remember it is the loss of moisture and natural oils that dried your skin out to begin with, don’t cause further aggravation with harsh chemicals! This can include masques, exfoliants and peels.

Protect your lips when going outside. Use a lip balm to keep the moisture in and banish those unsightly cracks – you will thank yourself. Remember that irritated skin reacts poorly when exposed to different materials and spicy food on sensitive lips can cause more than just a little discomfort.

Learning to control your winter skin is a battle well worth fighting. Just think of all the discomfort you have endured in the past seasons and make a commitment for this year to be different (a great New Year’s resolution!). If you are prone to dry skin, try keeping your regimen going all year round to see maximum benefits. Some treatments may require a few days to work to their full extent so be patient with your skin and allow it the time it needs to heal.