Archives for category: sensitive skin

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Eating foods with anti-inflammatories help to boost your immune system and promote healthy skin, for instants; foods like dark leafy greens and those rich in fatty acids, like sardines, fish oils, Indian gnee and flax seeds.

Keeping skin nourished with healthy fatty acids and fats, like coconut, avocado and olive oils, help your body absorb minerals and vitamins.  Fatty acids help repair and renew skin cells and promote a hormonal balance.

Depending on your skin concerns there are different things your can do to help de-stress your skin:

For Eczema- to prevent additional inflammation, drink immune supportive tea made from reships, echinacea and chamomile.  You can also apply room temperature tea bags to irritated skin for relief.  Avoid inflammatory chemicals, artificial dyes, harsh soaps and laundry detergents, and cleansers and disinfectants like chloride.

For Acne & Breakouts- these can be caused by bacteria, pregnancy, menopause and hormonal shifts.  Eat nutrient-rich foods and use skin care products that contain Vitamin C, antioxidant-rich ingredients like green tea, willow bark, tea tree oil, juniper and rosemary extracts.  Exfoliate both face and body regularly with willow bark or other antiseptic ingredients to help minimize breakouts.

For Dermatitis- symptoms of dermatitis can include; swelling, itching, burning and blotchy redness.  Severe symptoms are blisters, crusting, and oozing.  The causes are mostly from allergies or physical contact, for example, with synthetic fragrances, colorings, alcohol, FD+C dyes and synthetic preservatives.  Vitamin-rich ingredients with antiseptic qualities like antioxidant-rich elderflower, peppermint, aloe, witch hazel and calendula can help heal dermatitis.

For Redness + Rosacea- this is triggered by sun exposure, primarily.  Symptoms include redness around checks and nose, broken blood vessels, bumps that look like pimples, swollen or painful vein, stringing, itching and flushing easily.  The exact cause of rosacea is unknown, although it is most common in women ages 30-50 and fair-skinned people.  Treatments include topical vitamins, anti-inflammatory herbs, like turmeric, and skin soothing ingredients, like aloe and especially seed oils, like carrot and calendula.  Calendula contains bisabolol, an anti-inflammatory compound, because of this it helps reduce redness associated with rosacea by calming skin.  Switch to mineral-based makeup, use products with calming plants with antihistamine-like qualities, and healing herbs like sage and jasmine.

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Everyone at some point in their life will have chapped lips. Whether it is a mild annoyance or a serious interference on your everyday life, chapped lips should never just be ignored.

What causes chapped lips?

Chapped lips can occur for many reasons. Common causes include:

  • Dry/Cold weather: During the winter especially, staying inside and relying on forced air can dry out the skin, especially the lips and lead to cracking skin.
  • Medications: certain medications, such as those containing retinoids, high doses of vitamin a or certain chemotherapy medications can lead to dry skin, especially in the lips.
  • Dehydration: a lack of hydration affects all areas of your body, including the delicate skin on your lips.
  • Frequently licking your lips: it may sound counter-intuitive but frequently licking your lips can actually remove moisture and cause your lips to feel drier and begin to crack. Side note: bacteria from your mouth can enter these tiny cracks and cause infections – this can lead to serious medical problems that require medication.

How can they be fixed?

The good news is many over-the-counter remedies will work to smooth your lips and restore proper hydration. Here are some simple tips to remember:

  • Your lips need to be protected just like the rest of your skin. Choose a lip balm with SPF to prevent any damage from UV rays.
  • Avoid flavored lips balms which encourage licking as these will remove the balm and cause your lips to dry out further.
  • Lips balms with aloe vera and vitamin e may help to reduce redness and irritation.
  • Reapply frequently as lip balm gets removed by daily activities such as talking and eating.

One product that really works is Vibran C .  

When to seek medical attention

Persistent dry lips which do not respond to at-home treatment options should be looked at by a medical professional. Remember that your skin is an indicator of overall health and you should not ignore persistent skin issues, even if they seem inconsequential.

It’s summertime and the sun is finally starting to show. Now comes the time to choose a sunscreen that will protect your skin from those harmful UV rays we hear about all the time. Before grabbing the sunscreen next to the breath mints at checkout however, take some time to learn which sun blocker is going to give you the most bang for your buck.

So, what is an “SPF” anyway?

Sun Protection Factor rates how long the sunscreen is going to remain effective on your skin after application. If you want to work out the math, multiply the SPF by how long it takes your skin to suffer from a burn after being exposed to the sun with no protection at all.

For example: If you normally burn after 10 minutes with no protection, an SPF 15 will provide you with approximately 150 minutes of protection. Now here’s the rub: the effectiveness of a sunscreen can be lessened depending on the activity.

So, what do you need?

A summer tan may be stylish but remember that every time you go into the sun without adequate protection you are increasing your odds of developing serious skin conditions down the line. Not to mention more immediate effects such as burned skin, dryness and irritation. Your skin is a sensitive system that relies on being properly protected in order to function optimally. If you don’t want to develop rough, wrinkled skin that looks like leather, pay attention to the SPF your choosing.

An SPF of at least 15 is recommended but research shows that kicking that up to an SPF 30 will provide significantly more protection during the day. Also, you can’t just apply once and forget it. Sunscreen should be applied at least every 2 hours (maybe more if you are swimming or sweating).

Types of Sunscreens Available

There are two types of sunscreens available: chemical and physical.

Chemical sunscreens will absorb the UV rays but carry the risk on increasing the likelihood of developing certain types of cancers.

Physical sunscreens contain active ingredients that will reflect the harmful rays away from the skin.

What Ingredients to Look For

Search for ingredients such as titanium dioxide, zinc oxide, red petrolatum, or talc. These are commonly used in physical sunscreens and work well to protect the skin without adverse side effects.

Great Choices This Summer:

Sensitive skin has become one of those “catch all” phrases that describes a variety of things but does not carry a clear definition. Millions of people have sensitive skin but what does that mean exactly? Do they react badly to skin care protects? Are they especially affected by exposure to the sun? Do certain types of fabrics cause problems?

It’s easy to understand why the term “sensitive skin” may carry different meanings for different people. For example: if someone is complaining about sensitive skin to their esthetician, do they mean they are allergic to certain products or perhaps their skin simply reacts to certain ingredients more intensely than most people do. With so much variation in how a person may define their “sensitive” skin, it is important to understand how they are defining the term, sensitive.

Acne or Rosacea: Skin that is especially sensitive to products may react by producing acne or inflaming an existing rosacea condition. Excessive oils in products can easily clog the pores for people with this type of sensitivity. Instead of using products specially designed for “sensitive skin”, search for the underlying problem such as oily skin or inflamed skin.

Burning and Stinging: Some people apply a skin care product and immediately (or even after a few minutes) begin to experience a “burning or stinging” sensation on the face. This is not necessarily the same as an allergic reaction. Usually the cause of this sensation cannot be pinned down and remains unknown. Some ingredients have been known to cause this reaction more frequently including: lactic acid, azaelic acid, benzoic acid, glycolic acid, vitamin c and AHA’s.
A dermatologist may perform a test (once again, not an allergy test) to determine which ingredient the skin in reacting to so a patient can avoid products that will invoke a reaction. Currently there is no substantive research to determine why the skin will responds this way or a treatment that will work for everyone when it occurs. Usually removal of the product will reduce the sensation and it will go away on its own after a few minutes to several hours (depending on the original application amount).

Contact Dermatitis (Allergies): Finally, the issue most people refer to when they talk about sensitive skin. This refers to a specific allergy to a product, material or ingredient that causes an adverse reaction. An allergen is a reaction to a specific ingredient which your body is producing anti-bodies to combat the reaction. This is not the same as an irritant which will cause a reaction when applied to the skin (such as bleach on skin) but your body is not actively fighting as an allergy.

Trying to Determine the Cause: When a dermatologist is searching for the cause of an allergic reaction, they will need to rely heavily on a patient’s history to narrow down possible suspects. Remember, doctors need complete disclosure of any product usage to obtain accurate results. When you withhold critical information for one reason or another, it prolongs the process and could lead to misdiagnosis and unnecessary additional tests to find an unknown cause.

Avoiding the Problem: If you are shopping for new products or want to undergo any skin care treatment, make sure to inform your esthetician of any adverse reactions you’ve had prior to your appointment. This will prevent complications when specialized products are used. Remember that many spa products use higher concentrations of ingredients to obtain more dramatic results so telling your esthetician in advance can prevent a severe reaction.

Conclusion: Searching for products geared towards “sensitive skin” can be a waste of time and money if you don’t know to root of your problem. Determining a true allergy versus and irritation can help resolve a lot of mystery and ensure you have proper treatment should an allergic reaction occur. Remember that not all skin reactions require medical attention but if you have any concerns or contact with potentially dangerous materials, contact your primary care physician immediately. A referral to a skin care specialist may be necessary for especially sensitive care cases or concerns.

Learn more great skin care tips online at http://www.bellaninainstitute.com.